Weather in Iceland can be tough sometimes. You should know some things about rain, wind, and temperature, in order to prepare yourself correctly.

Rain

Statistics based on the last 30 years show that there is an average number of 12 days with precipitation per month. In other words, if you are staying in Iceland, you will definitely encounter rain in the summer months or snow in winter. However, I have some good news, based upon my own experiences: I’ve been in Iceland for barely three weeks and almost every day would be counted as a day with rainfall. However, in 18 days we only had one day full of rain. During all the other days, the rain only continued for an hour or much less. I cannot tell if we’ve just been lucky or this is the usual way in Iceland. With that said you should not be feared by watching the statistics.

Temperature

The fact that you are interested in Iceland shows that you are not the type of a person that needs 30 °C all day long and a beach to relax on for 8 hours in a row.
That’s good since best Iceland can offer you are 13 °C in the warmest month, July. Only from May to September you can be quite sure that there won’t be frost.
Good to know: The temperature is quite stable every year thus you can easily use the data from the table to know how warm it is going to get in Iceland. There are just a few degrees of variation from this average data. The data counts for Reykjavik. Be sure to check that especially in the northeast it can get a few degrees colder. Not to mention the highlands! In October, in the south, we usually experienced the 6-8 °C, which fits the data shown in the table. In the northeast, it’s been 3-5 °C and it did freeze in the night (-2 °C).
However, we should accept that no matter when we are traveling to Iceland, we should be prepared to have some warm clothes. To grab some recommendations about how to stay both warm and dry in Iceland, go to the blog article about what to pack into your suitcase on the button below.

Month Min.
Temp.
(°C)
 Max.
Temp.
(°C)
Preci-
pitation
(mm)
 Precipi-
tation
Days
Jan -3.0 1.9 75.6 13.3
Feb -2.1 2.8 71.8 12.5
Mar -2.0 3.2 81.8 14.4
Apr 0.4 5.7 58.3 12.2
May 3.6 9.4 43.8 9.8
Jun 6.7 11.7 50.0 10.7
Jul 8.3 13.3 51.8 10.0
Aug 7.9 13.0 61.8 11.7
Sep 5.0 10.1 66.5 12.4
Oct 2.2 6.8 85.6 14.5
Nov -1.3 3.4 72.5 12.5
Dec -2.8 2.2 78.7 13.9

Data from WORLD METEOROLOGICAL ORGANIZATION. See http://worldweather.wmo.int/en/city.html?cityId=189

Wind

Imagine the windiest place you have ever been to. Congratulations, you just imagined Iceland.
On http://www.vedur.is/ – a website you will use every day in Iceland, you can find a wind map. This map usually is covered in blue, which means a wind velocity of about 8 to 14 m/s. Usually, this speed would be considered as a strong wind everywhere else than in Iceland. In Iceland, it’s a good sign and means something like “great condition, go out and have fun!”. Jokes aside, you will definitely notice that Iceland is very windy and always being informed about the wind is highly important for your safety. When the map shows a purple wind you should not drive your camping car since it could be pushed away from the track. Moreover, at certain speeds, you should not drive in the southern areas of the black sand beaches since there could be sandstorms. We have been adviced to stop driving the caravan when the map indicates a wind velocity of 16 m/s or higher in a purple color.

Climate Reykjavik

Data from WORLD METEOROLOGICAL ORGANIZATION. See http://worldweather.wmo.int/en/city.html?cityId=189

Weather in Iceland can be tough sometimes. You should know some things about rain, wind, and temperature, in order to prepare yourself correctly.

Rain

Statistics based on the last 30 years show that there is an average number of 12 days with precipitation per month. In other words, if you are staying in Iceland, you will definitely encounter rain in the summer months or snow in winter. However, I have some good news, based upon my own experiences: I’ve been in Iceland for barely three weeks and almost every day would be counted as a day with rainfall. However, in 18 days we only had one day full of rain. During all the other days, the rain only continued for an hour or much less. I cannot tell if we’ve just been lucky or this is the usual way in Iceland. With that said you should not be feared by watching the statistics.

Temperature

The fact that you are interested in Iceland shows that you are not the type of a person that needs 30 °C all day long and a beach to relax on for 8 hours in a row.
That’s good since best Iceland can offer you are 13 °C in the warmest month, July. Only from May to September you can be quite sure that there won’t be frost.
Good to know: The temperature is quite stable every year thus you can easily use the data from the table to know how warm it is going to get in Iceland. There are just a few degrees of variation from this average data. The data counts for Reykjavik. Be sure to check that especially in the northeast it can get a few degrees colder. Not to mention the highlands! In October, in the south, we usually experienced the 6-8 °C, which fits the data shown in the table. In the northeast, it’s been 3-5 °C and it did freeze in the night (-2 °C).
However, we should accept that no matter when we are traveling to Iceland, we should be prepared to have some warm clothes. To grab some recommendations about how to stay both warm and dry in Iceland, go to the blog article about what to pack into your suitcase on the button below.

Month Mean Daily Minimum Temperature (°C) Mean Daily Maximum Temperature (°C) Mean Total Precipitation
(mm)
Mean Number of Precipitation Days
Jan -3.0 1.9 75.6 13.3
Feb -2.1 2.8 71.8 12.5
Mar -2.0 3.2 81.8 14.4
Apr 0.4 5.7 58.3 12.2
May 3.6 9.4 43.8 9.8
Jun 6.7 11.7 50.0 10.7
Jul 8.3 13.3 51.8 10.0
Aug 7.9 13.0 61.8 11.7
Sep 5.0 10.1 66.5 12.4
Oct 2.2 6.8 85.6 14.5
Nov -1.3 3.4 72.5 12.5
Dec -2.8 2.2 78.7 13.9

Data from WORLD METEOROLOGICAL ORGANIZATION. See http://worldweather.wmo.int/en/city.html?cityId=189

Wind

Imagine the windiest place you have ever been to. Congratulations, you just imagined Iceland.
On http://www.vedur.is/ – a website you will use every day in Iceland, you can find a wind map. This map usually is covered in blue, which means a wind velocity of about 8 to 14 m/s. Usually, this speed would be considered as a strong wind everywhere else than in Iceland. In Iceland, it’s a good sign and means something like “great condition, go out and have fun!”. Jokes aside, you will definitely notice that Iceland is very windy and always being informed about the wind is highly important for your safety. When the map shows a purple wind you should not drive your camping car since it could be pushed away from the track. Moreover, at certain speeds, you should not drive in the southern areas of the black sand beaches since there could be sandstorms. We have been adviced to stop driving the caravan when the map indicates a wind velocity of 16 m/s or higher in a purple color.

Climate Reykjavik

Data from WORLD METEOROLOGICAL ORGANIZATION. See http://worldweather.wmo.int/en/city.html?cityId=189